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Music in the USA : a documentary companion / Judith Tick editor with Paul Beaudoin assistant editor.

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  • 0 of 1 copy available at Berklee College of Music.

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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Holdable? Status Due Date
Main Library ML200 .M89 2008 37684001054222 Library Stacks Not holdable Damaged -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780195139877
  • ISBN: 0195139879
  • ISBN: 9780195139884
  • ISBN: 0195139887
  • Physical Description: xxxvii, 881 p. : ill., music ; 26 cm.
  • Publisher: Oxford ; Oxford University Press, 2008.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
1540-1770. 1. Early encounters between indigenous peoples and European explorers / (Castañeda, Drake, de Meras, Smith, Wood) -- 2. From the Preface to the first edition of the Bay psalm book -- 3. Four translations of Psalm 100 / (Tehilim, Bay Psalm Book, 1640 and 1698, Watts) -- 4. From the diaries of Samuel Sewall -- 5. The ministers rally for musical literacy / (Mather, Walter, Symmes) -- 6. Benjamin Franklin advises his brother on how to write a ballad and how not to write like Handel -- 7. Social music for the elite in colonial Williamsburg -- 8. Advertisements and notices from colonial newspapers.
1770-1830. 9. "Christopher Crotchet, singing master from Quavertown" -- 10. Singing the revolution / (Adams, Dickinson, Greeley) -- 11. Elisha Bostwick hears a Scots prisoner sing "Gypsie Laddie" -- 12. A sidebar into ballad scholarship : the wanderings of "The gypsy laddie" / (Child, Sharp, Coffin, Bronson) -- 13. William Billings and the new sacred music / (Billings, Gould) -- 14. Daniel Read on pirating and "scientific music" -- 15. Turn-of-the-century theater songs from Reinagle, Rowson, and Carr : "America, commerce, and freedom" and "The little sailor boy" -- 16. Padre Narciso Durán describes musical training at the Mission San Jose -- 17. Moravian musical life at Bethlehem / (Henry, Till, Bowne) -- 18. Reverend Burkitt brings camp meeting hymns from Kentucky to North Carolina in 1803 -- 19. John Fanning Watson and errors in Methodist worship -- 19. Reverend James B. Finley and Mononcue sing "Come thou fount of every blessing".
1830-1880. 21. Thomas D. Rice acts out Jim Crow and Cuff -- 22. William M. Whitlock, banjo player for the Virginia Minstrels -- 23. Edwin P. Christy, Stephen Foster, and "Ethiopian minstrelsy" -- 24. Stephen Foster's legacy / (Foster, Gordon, Robb, Simpson, Willis, Galli-Curci, Ellington, Charles) -- 25. The Fasola folk, The southern harmony, and The sacred harp / (Walker, White, King) -- 26. A sidebar into the discovery of shape-note music by a national audience / (Jackson, The sacred harp, 1991) -- 27. The Boston public schools set a national precedent in music education -- 28. Lorenzo Da Ponte recruits an Italian opera company for New York -- 29. Music education for American girls -- 30. Early expressions of cultural nationalism / (Hopkins, Fry, Putnam's Monthly) -- 31. John S. Dwight remembers how he and his circle "were but babes in music" -- 32. George Templeton Strong hears the American premiere of Beethoven's Fifth -- 33. German Americans adapting and contributing to musical life -- 34. Emil Klauprecht's German-American novel, Cincinnati, oder, Die Geheimnisse des Westens -- 35. P.T. Barnum and the Jenny Lind fever -- 36. Miska Hauser, Hungarian violinist, pans for musical gold -- 37. From the journals of Louis Moreau Gottschalk -- 38. The 'four-part blend' of the Hutchinson Family -- 39. Walt Whitman's conversion to opera -- 40. Clara Kellogg and the memoirs of an American prima donna -- 41. Frederick Douglass from My bondage and my freedom -- 42. Harriet Beecher Stowe and two scenes from Uncle Tom's cabin -- 43. From Slave songs of the United States (1867) -- 44. A sidebar into memory : slave narratives from the Federal Writers' Project in the new deal -- 45. George F. Root recalls how he wrote a classic union song -- 46. A confederate girl's diary during the Civil War -- 47. Soldier-musicians from the North and the South recall duties on the front -- 48. Ella Sheppard Moore, a Fisk Jubilee Singer --- 49. Patrick S. Gilmore and the golden age of bands / (Newspaper review, Herbert) -- 50. Theodore Thomas and his musical manifest destiny / (Rose Fay Thomas, Theodore Thomas).
1880-1920. 51. John Philip Sousa : excerpts from his Autobiography -- 52. Why is a good march like a marble statue? / (Pryor, Fennell) -- 3. Willa Cather mourns the passing of the small-town opera house -- 54. Henry Lee Higginson and the founding of the Boston Symphony Orchestra -- 55. American classical music goes to the Paris World's Fair of 1889 -- 56. George Chadwick's ideals for composing classical concert music -- 57. Late 19th-century cultural nationalism : the paradigm of Dvořák / (Creelman, Paine, Burleigh) -- 58. Henry Krehbiel explains a critic's craft and a listener's duty -- 59. Amy Fay tackles the "woman question" -- 60. Amy Beach, composer, on "Why I chose my profession" -- 61. Edward MacDowell, poet-musician, remembered / (Currier, Gilman) -- 62. Paul Rosenfeld's manifesto for American composers -- 63. From the writings of Charles Ives -- 64. Frederic Louis Ritter looks for the "people's song" -- 65. Frances Densmore and the documentation of American Indian songs and poetry -- 66. A sidebar into national cultural policy : the Federal Cylinder Project -- 67. Charles K. Harris on writing hits for Tin Pan Alley -- 68. Scott Joplin, ragtime visionary / (Scott Joplin, Lottie Joplin) -- 69. A sidebar into the ragtime revival of the 1970s : William Bolcom reviews The collected works of Scott Joplin -- 70. James Reese Europe on the origin of "modern dances" -- 71. Irving Berlin on "love-interest as a commodity" in popular songs -- 72. Caroline Caffin on the "music and near-music" of Vaudeville -- 73. Ferdinand "Jelly Roll" Morton describes New Orleans and the discipline of jazz.
1920-1950. 74. Bessie Smith, artist and blues singer / (press notice, Bailey, Schuller) -- 75. Thomas Andrew Dorsey "Brings the people up" and carries himself along -- 76. Louis Armstrong in his own words -- 77. Gilbert Seldes waves the flag of pop -- 78. Al Jolson and The jazz singer -- 79. Carl Stalling : master of cartoon music : an interview -- 80. A sidebar into postmodernism: John Zorn Turns Carl Stalling into a Prophet -- 81. Alec Wilder writes lovingly about Jerome Kern -- 82. George Gershwin explains that "Jazz is the voice of the American soul" -- 83. William Grant Still, pioneering African American composer / (Still, Locke, Still) -- 84. The inimitable Henry Cowell as described by the irrepressible Nicolas Slonimsky -- 85. Ruth Crawford and her "astonishing juxtapositions" -- 86. "River Sirens, Lion Roars, all music to Varèse" : an interview in Santa Fe -- 87. Leopold Stokowski and "debatable music" -- 88. Henry Leland Clark on the Composers Collective -- 89. Marc Blitzstein in and out of the treetops of The cradle will rock -- 90. Samuel Barber and the controversy around the premiere of Adagio for strings / (Downes, Pettis, Menotti, Harris) -- 91. Virgil Thomson, composer and critic -- 92. Arthur Berger divides Aaron Copland into two styles and Copland puts himself back together again -- 93. Aaron Copland on the "personality of Stravinsky" -- 94. The American period of Arnold Schoenberg / (Sessions, Newlin) -- 95. Uncle Dave Macon, banjo trickster at the Grand Ole Opry -- 96. The Bristol sessions and country music -- 97. A sidebar into the folk revival : Harry Smith's canon of old-time recordings -- 98. Zora Neale Hurston on "spirituals and neo-spirituals" -- 99. The hard times of Emma Dusenbury, source singer -- 100. John and Alan Lomax propose a "Canon for American folk song" -- 101. Woody Guthrie praises the "spunkfire" attitude of a folk song -- 102. Fred Astaire dances like a twentieth-century American / (Williams) -- 103. The innovations of Oklahoma! / (de Mille, Engel) -- 104. Duke Ellington on swing as a way of life -- 105. Malcolm X recalls the years of swing -- 106. The many faces of Billie Holiday / (Holiday, Wilson, Bennett) -- 107. Ralph Ellison and the birth of bebop at Minton's.
1950-1975. 108. Ella Fitzgerald on stage / (Peterson) -- 109. Leonard Bernstein charts an epic role for musical theater -- 110. Stephen Sondheim on writing theater lyrics -- 111. Muddy Waters explains "why it doesn't pay to run from trouble" -- 112. Elvis Presley in the eye of musical twister / (newspaper reviews, Gould, Lewis) -- 113. Chuck Berry in his own words -- 114. The five string banjo : hints from the 1960s speed-master, Earl Scruggs -- 115. Pete Seeger, a TCUAPSS, Sings out!" -- 116. Bob Dylan turns liner notes into poetry -- 117. Janis Joplin grabs pieces of our hearts / (Joplin, Graham) -- 118. "Handcrafting the grooves" in the studio: Aretha Franklin at Muscle Shoals / (Wexler) -- 119. Jimi Hendrix, virtuoso of electricity / (Hendrix, Bloomfield) -- 120. Amiri Baraka theorizes a black nationalist aesthetic -- 121. Greil Marcus and the new rock criticism -- 122. Charles Reich on the music of "Consciousness III" -- 123. McCoy Tyner on "the jubilant experience of John Coltrane"s classic quartet -- 124. Miles Davis : excerpts from his autobiography -- 125. A Vietnam vet remembers rocking and rolling in the mud of war -- 126. George Crumb and Black angels : "A quartet in time of war" -- 127. Milton Babbitt on electronic music / (Babbitt, Brody and Miller) -- 128. Edward T. Cone satirizes music theory's new vocabulary -- 129. Mario Davidovsky, an introduction / (Chasalow) -- 130. Elliot Carter on the "different time worlds" in String quartets no. 1 and 2 -- 131. John Cage, words and Music for changes / (Cage, Anderson) -- 132. Harold Schonberg on "art and bunk, matter and anti matter" -- 133. Pauline Oliveros, composer and teacher -- 134. Steve Reich on "music as a gradual process".
1975-2000. 135. Star Wars meets Wagner / (Dyer, Tomlinson) -- 136. Tom Johnson demonstrates what minimalism is all about -- 137. Morton Feldman and his West German fan base / (Feldman, Post) -- 138. Philip Glass and the roots of reform opera -- 139 Laurie Anderson does "stand-up" performance art / (Anderson, Gordon) -- 140. Meredith Monk and the revelation of voice -- 141. Recapturing the soul of the American orchestra / (Duffy, Tower) -- 142. Two economists measure the impact of blind auditions -- 143. John Harbison on modes of composing -- 144. Wynton Marsalis on learning from the past for the sake of the present -- 145. John Adams, an American master -- 146. The incorporation of the American Folklife Center -- 147. Daniel J. Boorstin's welcoming remarks at the Conference on Ethnic Recordings in America -- 148. Willie Colón on "conscious salsa" -- 149. The accordion travels through "roots music" / (Savoy) -- 150. Conjunto music--"a very beautiful accordiante flower / (Santiago Jiménez, Flaco Jiménez, Jordán) -- 151. Gloria Anzaldúa on Vistas y corridos : my native tongue -- 152. Contemporary Native American music and the Pine Ridge Reservation / (Porcupine Singers, Frazier) -- 153. MTV and the music video / (MoMA, Hoberman) -- 154. Turning points in the career of Michael Jackson / (Jackson, Jones) -- 155. Sally Banes explains why "breaking is hard to do" -- 156. Two members of public enemy discuss sampling and copyright law -- 157. DJ Qbert, master of turntable music -- 158. A press release from the Country Music Association -- 159. Ephemeral music : Napster's congressional testimony.
Subject: Music > United States > History and criticism > Sources.

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